More Than The Formal Art Education:

Art lessons can be based on the elements of art (line, shape, value, texture, color) and the arrangement of those elements in composition (unity, variety, rhythm, balance, proportion, and scale). These elements can be taught through any class in a way that kids can easily understand and still be challenged to think critically and solve problems.  However, an art education is more than learning to recognize the formal elements of design and composition!  Just as a great work of art is more than the sum of its parts, a great art class teaches the student how to use any medium to express their specific and individual ideas!

 
  Meaningful Communication Through The Visual Arts:   Through the lessons, projects, and experiments, young artist are encouraged to regard their artwork in terms of its effectiveness at communicating their emotions, thoughts, and ideas.  Even if the project evolves and the idea changes, young artists practice awareness of what this new change communicates to the viewer.  This is important in two ways.  First being that the reason most kids give up on art is due to dissatisfaction of their skill level.  While we practice skills through several media and with lots of different materials, the primary focus is on communication and self-expression.  In other words, most of the time the point is not how accurately a student can draw (it takes a lot of practice anyway) but how well the student is "seeing" the artwork, or what their quality of line expresses. For instance, a dark thick line, a light broken line, soft edges, scratchy, etc.).  A student can discover, and take pride in what kind of line, and by extension what kind of drawing they naturally make.  "I like to make nervous drawings." "My lines are sharp and powerful." Secondly, art has meaning.  And meaning would be quite limited across the entire world if we all did things the same way and copied the same painting.  

 

Meaningful Communication Through The Visual Arts:

 

Through the lessons, projects, and experiments, young artist are encouraged to regard their artwork in terms of its effectiveness at communicating their emotions, thoughts, and ideas.  Even if the project evolves and the idea changes, young artists practice awareness of what this new change communicates to the viewer.  This is important in two ways.  First being that the reason most kids give up on art is due to dissatisfaction of their skill level.  While we practice skills through several media and with lots of different materials, the primary focus is on communication and self-expression.  In other words, most of the time the point is not how accurately a student can draw (it takes a lot of practice anyway) but how well the student is "seeing" the artwork, or what their quality of line expresses. For instance, a dark thick line, a light broken line, soft edges, scratchy, etc.).  A student can discover, and take pride in what kind of line, and by extension what kind of drawing they naturally make.  "I like to make nervous drawings." "My lines are sharp and powerful."

Secondly, art has meaning.  And meaning would be quite limited across the entire world if we all did things the same way and copied the same painting.